animartdesign

DESIGN

  • XPO: POP! DESIGN • CULTURE • FASHION

    Fashion and Textile Museum – London
    XPO: POP! DESIGN • CULTURE • FASHION
    6 July 2012 – 27 October 2012

     

    In the 1950s a new wave of rock-n-roll and youth culture from America swept the country and the world. The mix of popular images and music with art and fashion would change the way people dressed – blurring the boundaries of commerce, culture and style.

    POP! will explore the impact of music, art and personality on the development of the fashion of the times. From the poodle skirts and embellished leathers of the rockers through to the Punk era, this exhibition will take in the cool stylings of the Mods, the high baroque of Psychedelia and the kitsch glamour of 70s retro by designers such as Mr Freedom and Miss Mouse.

    Highlights will include items from Elton John’s personal wardrobe, purple flares worn by Donovan, the pop-art fashions of Mary Quant as well as Quant’s early modernist pieces from the original Bazaar, and original pieces from Westwood and McLaren’s Sex. Furniture, original posters and graphics and promotional materials will help to set the scene while an “I’m Backing Britain” display will create a dramatic centrepiece.
    The exhibition will provide new insight into 20 years of popular culture from one of the most comprehensive private collections of design and fashion.
    Exhibition Dates: 6 Jul – 27 Oct 2012
Open Tuesday to Saturday, 11am – 6pm 
Last Admissions 5.15pm
Closed Sunday and Monday

    More info:
    ftmlondon.org

  • Vintage Design Market / Knokke


    About 50 international Vintage Design dealers will expose rare pieces of work on the Knokke beach promenade, next second of july.
    This edition will also see an extra « Vintage Fashion » section with Chanel, Dior, Courrèges and many other great fashion designers.


    DesignMarkt / Knokke-Heist
    Saturday July 2
    ZeeDijk, Knokke.



  • Eero Saarinen

    The son of architect and Cranbrook Academy of Art director Eliel Saarinen and his wife, textile artist Loja, Eero Saarinen studied sculpture in Paris and architecture at Yale before working on furniture design with Norman Bel Geddes and practicing architecture with his father. He collaborated on several projects in furniture design with his friend, Cranbrook alumnus Charles Eames, and opened his own practice in Bloomfield Hills in 1950.

    Among the many buildings for which he is known are the Dulles International Airport in Washington, DC, The Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, and the TWA Terminal at Kennedy International Airport in New York. He was the recipient of numerous awards and the subject of many exhibitions.

    (photograph: Knoll)


  • Ball Chair

    Ball Chair by Eero Aarnio 1966

    The Ball Chair – or Globe Chair as it’s called sometimes – was designed by using one of the most simple geometric forms – the ball.

    Cutting of a part and fixing it at one point Eero Aarnio comes to a remarkable result – a completely unconventional shaped chair: A Ball Chair is a « room within a room » with a cozy and calm athmosphere, protecting outside noises and giving a private space for relaxing or having a phonecall. Turning around its own axis on the base the view to the outer space is variable for the user and thus he is not completely excluded from world outside.

    The Vitra Design Museum notes in his brochure on the Ball Chair miniature: « It is something between a piece of furniture and a piece of architecture and at the same time embodies both the mobile and the established, the fixed. » – You’ll find this miniature at the Vitra Design Museum’s Shop.


    Aarnio: « The idea of the chair was very obvious. We had moved to our first home and I had started my free-lance career in 1962.We had a home but no proper big chair, so I decided to make one, but some way a really new one. After some drawing I noticed that the shape of the chair had become so simple that it was merely a ball. I pinned the full scale drawing on the wall and ‚sat’ in the chair to see how my head would move when sitting inside it.

    Being the taller one of us I‚ sat’ in the chair and my wife drew the course of my head on the wall. This is how I determined the height of the chair. Since I aimed at a ball shape, the other lines were easy to draw, just remembering that the chair would have to fit through a doorway.After this I made the first prototype myself using an inside mould, which has been made using the same principle as a glider fuselage or wing. I covered the plywood body mould with wet paper and laminated the surface with fiberglass, rubbed down the outside, removed the mould from inside, had it upholstered and added the leg. In the end I installed the red telephone on the inside wall of the chair. The naming part of the chair was easy, the BALL CHAIR was born. »

    The result was great. It was the birth of one of the most remarkable chairs in the furniture history of the 20th century.
    This first hand made Ball Chair is still standing in Eero’s house. It was this first prototype two young managers from the company Asko discovered when visiting Eero to see some pine wood designs. They were immediatly impressed and convinced of the phenomenal design. It took a few years to get it into production.

    1966 the Ball Chair was presented at the international furniture fair in Cologne. It was the sensation of the fair, the international breakthrough for Eero Aarnio and the start for a whole line of fibreglass designs by Aarnio.